sMotherShame

sMotherShame

Exposing the Legacy of Shame
“Why didn’t they report their sexual harassment sooner?”
“Why didn’t they report their sexual harassment sooner?”
An erstwhile friend said to me, “I don’t get it.  Where were these women 20 or 30 years ago?  Why didn’t they report this sexual...
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Why We Shouldn’t Listen to our Mothers
Why We Shouldn’t Listen to our Mothers
Mothers aren't always the best source of career advice. When I was 17, I took a summer job as a cashier in the gift shop...
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Could Hillary Have Ever Been Elected? A Feminist Analysis
Could Hillary Have Ever Been Elected? A Feminist Analysis
With the benefit of hindsight, it’s easy to see that the moment had passed Hillary by. Yes, it’s true—as people said-- that she lacked the...
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Exposing Shame

Have you ever wondered how it would feel to free yourself from the legacy of shame? The burden of shame is transmitted by the mothers of our generation, whose smothered ambitions and unfulfilled expectations have spilled over and contaminated us with a legacy of shame. Shame is inherently social and has its roots in social contradictions that begin at an early age.  In order to feel shame, we have to have been shamed.  The fusion of identity with shame is formed and reinforced through repeated and elaborated experience of those contradictions as we grow.   The  meanings of shame have changed in our lifetime, and the mid-1970s formed the watershed years for that change. 

We can learn to live without shame.  In this blog we explore the roots of shame in order to deconstruct our historical narratives of self and reconstruct them in accord with the self that we want to become.
For more: Learning to Live Without Shame

Wars Among Women: Have Men Become Instruments?

The status wars among women are playing out on college campuses today.  Men are the instruments, and the principal weapon is shame.    In one sense, that is not news.  Women have long used men for the fulfillment of their dreams …

Sheila K

Sheila Klatzky is a former sociologist with a B.A. from Reed College and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.  She was an associate professor of sociology with tenure at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Fordham University before leaving the academic world for a 20+ year career in sales and marketing.   She has also been a consultant to small businesses.

Her professional publications include:  Patterns of Contact with Relatives, a monograph published by the American Sociological Association.  She has published in a variety of journals, including The American Journal of Sociology, The Journal of Business and the Journal of the American Statistical Association.  She is currently a Board Member of the Westchester Women’s Agenda, a women’s advocacy group, and the lead contributor on the WWA’s 2016 Report on the Status of Women in Westchester County.   She lives in Westchester County, New York, and has a daughter who also lives in Westchester County.